IC3 Black Cohosh/CBD

IC3 Black Cohosh/CBD

Regular price $199.95 $39.95 Sale

After some testing on myself and my inner circle I am proud to introduce a locally made product that works with PcSPES specifically formulated for Prostate Cancer. It has been officially added to my protocol diet and will help you and thousands. It was originally doctor recommended to me so I decided to pursue it and am pleased with it's results.

Mechanism of Action
Most of the published literature addressing the effect of black cohosh for the prevention or treatment of prostate cancer is limited to in vitro and animal studies exploring its possible mechanisms of action. However, intriguing data are surfacing showing that black cohosh extracts may be useful in both the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer.
Black cohosh has the ability to bind to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a receptor that mediates a variety of anticancer effects in both prostate and breast cancer cells.6One research group followed up this finding by testing a standardized black cohosh extract (BNO 1055) in an AhR ligand assay and on androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells (type LNCaP) in vitro.7 The results of this study showed a statistically significant decrease in binding of a known ligand to AhR, and inhibited proliferation of LNCaP in a dose-dependent manner.
Furthermore, in other tests, black cohosh blocked the prostate cancer cell proliferation that normally happens in the presence of added estrogen or dihydrotestosterone. Given some of the doubts surfacing about the ability of black cohosh to bind to the known estrogen receptors alpha and beta, the researchers in this study mention that the anticancer effects may be mediated through AhR or some other unknown estrogen receptor.
Another group tested an isopropanolic-aqueous extract of black cohosh on LNCaP and two androgen-insensitive cell lines, PC-3 and DU 145.8 The black cohosh caused dose-dependent growth inhibition in all three cell lines (P < 0.001), and this inhibition was consistent with apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry. LNCaP was most susceptible to apoptotic cell death, occurring at a lower concentration than what was required to inhibit DU 145 and PC-3. The researchers also noted that induction of caspase, an enzyme involved in some apoptosis mechanisms, occurred in all three cells lines at a medium concentration (40 µg/mL) of black cohosh. The researchers conclude that black cohosh acts to induce apoptotic cell death, perhaps through the caspase system, and it seems to do so independently of androgen receptor status. Should these results be corroborated, a possible future use of a therapy like black cohosh would be to "prime" prostate cancer cells via caspase for more easily induced apoptosis (i.e., lower doses of chemotherapeutic agents and, hence, fewer side effects).
Given that some prostate cancer cells, such as the LNCaP line, are androgen-dependent, presumably due to the fact that testosterone is converted within the prostate by 5-alpha reductase to a potent prostatic growth stimulator 5-alpha dihydrotestosterone (DHT),9 5-alpha reductase has been the target of potential prostate cancer treatments. One research group found inhibition of this enzyme by black cohosh.10 Twenty subjects per group were fed testosterone for five days with a subcutaneous injection of either a standardized black cohosh extract (BNO 1055), finasteride (a known 5-alpha reductase inhibitor), or nothing, and prostate size and weights, as well as prostate and serum testosterone and DHT concentrations, were compared. In both the black cohosh and finasteride groups there were statistically significant (P < 0.05) lower serum testosterone and DHT levels, as well as smaller prostates and seminal vesicles. By this indirect methodology, black cohosh appears to have some 5-alpha reductase inhibition comparable to finasteride, and this is being explored as a possible avenue to prevent and/or treat prostate cancer.